The Campaign for the Carlson School of Management
Faculty

A Force for Innovation

Faculty Support

By unearthing new insights through research and teaching future professionals, Carlson School faculty drive business forward.

Their areas of expertise span the areas of consumer behavior, data analytics, entrepreneurship, human resources, strategy, and much more. Organizations around the world utilize their research to make crucial decisions, while students rely on them to break down challenging concepts and encourage skill development.

But competition for these leading thinkers, teachers, and researchers—both promising young scholars and mid-career standouts—is intense, and the growth of new degree programs and our undergraduate population increases demand. To maintain our high standards for educational excellence and continue to support research that addresses genuine business challenges, we must secure and retain high-caliber faculty.

 

  • Driving Change In Research

    Dare to Care PhD Students
    Anne Tsui

    Few believe in “Business as a Force for Good” more than Anne Tsui.

    As a business school professor, she’s seen firsthand the impact a professor can have on the students they teach. But the further she got into her career, the more she saw how most of the research being done at business schools focused on how to turn a profit, many times at the expense of the large stakeholders.

    Tsui wanted to change that. She established the Dare to Care Award at the Carlson School, which encourages doctoral students to conduct research that not only improves a company’s operations, but also does right by their employees and better serves their customers.

    The first Dare to Care Award was given in 2013 as a way to “assist advanced PhD students who have shown dedication to conducting research that will bring value to society, beyond providing good careers for themselves.”

    “The award is to encourage students to look at business problems that would be beneficial to society as a whole and to encourage caring of groups that are less powerful in a business environment,” Tsui says.

    Doctoral students play a vital role in the Carlson School community. Not only do they take part in groundbreaking research, they also teach young business students.

    “The students are being trained to become the professors and researchers in different schools worldwide. They will be in a very powerful position to lead the future development of both the next generation of students, as well as businesses through their research,” she says. “We want to train our PhD students not only how to teach and what to teach, but also why to teach and why to do research.”

    Tsui received her bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Minnesota-Duluth before coming to the Carlson School and earning a master’s degree in industrial relations.

    Now living in Arizona, Tsui says although she hasn't been back to the state of Minnesota in quite some time, she still feels a connection and considers it “home.”

    “I remember my time in Minnesota, and at the Carlson School, very fondly,” she says. “That’s a big reason why I wanted to give back.

    With the Carlson School now focusing its efforts on “Business as a Force for Good,” Tsui says she couldn’t be happier to support the school and its mission.

    “It tells me that the Carlson School, as a whole, dares to care,” she says. “It is entirely consistent with the vision of the Dare to Care PhD Award that business research can be a force for good by identifying business practices that contribute to the wellbeing of stakeholders beyond the shareholders.”

    We want to train our PhD students not only how to teach and what to teach, but also why to teach and why to do research.
Your investment develops leaders, spurs innovation, and sustains excellence.

Naming opportunities are available to support students, faculty, experiential learning, and facilities. 

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  • Investing in the Faculty Pipeline

    Through the Lawrence Fellowship

    Gordon Burtch
    Jim and Mary Lawrence

    Jim and Mary Lawrence want to plug what they call the “doughnut hole” in the tenure track.

    “When you get a PhD, we all know you are desperate for any job you can have, although that is less true of business schools” he says. “When you are offered a job at the U, you most likely will be delighted to take it.” He notes that the Carlson School has a proven track record of selecting the best of the next generation of faculty coming out of PhD programs.

    The doughnut hole typically appears after the faculty member’s third or fourth year, or just after tenure. “At that time, the faculty member will have published probably the best research they will publish in the course of their lives,” he says. The research is out there for other institutions to see it. Let’s say they happen to need an expert on labor economics in Eastern Europe and there is a professor at the Carlson School who has written about it. Then they swoop in.

    “At that point, the professor will be judging his or her options,” he says. “’OK, I’m pretty good at my discipline, but will I be better off at a big brand school?’ Stanford, Harvard, or Wharton might be able to steal our faculty.”

    This is where the Lawrence Fellowship comes in. The purpose of the fellowship is to hold the best junior and mid-level faculty. “Hold them until we give them tenure, and just after,” he says. “It allows Dean Sri Zaheer and her committee to figure out who the people we hired four to eight years ago turned out to be the stars. Let’s give them more money or give them time off to do more wonderful research.”

    Mary says the Fellowship is a great opportunity to retain the best at the Carlson School. “This is a critical time to keep your faculty happy and give them extra salary or some unencumbered time to do research and to let them know we appreciate what they are doing,” she says.

    Five faculty members were honored as the inaugural Lawrence Fellows earlier this year. They include Information and Decision Sciences Assistant Professor Gordon Burtch (pictured above) and Associate Professor Yuqing Ren, Strategic Management and Entrepreneurship Assistant Professor Aseem Kaul, and Work and Organizations Assistant Professor Aaron Sojourner and Associate Professor Colleen Manchester.

    “We met the Lawrence Fellows recently and they are just outstanding,” Jim says. For example, “We have this one woman [Manchester] who is a Stanford undergrad and a Stanford PhD and we got her, not Stanford B-school! That’s just fantastic.”

    This is a critical time to keep your faculty happy and give them extra salary or some unencumbered time to do research and to let them know we appreciate what they are doing.
Your investment develops leaders, spurs innovation, and sustains excellence.

Naming opportunities are available to support students, faculty, experiential learning, and facilities. 

More About Naming Opportunities »

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