The Campaign for the Carlson School of Management
Faculty

A Force for Innovation

Faculty Support

By unearthing new insights through research and teaching future professionals, Carlson School faculty drive business forward.

Their areas of expertise span the areas of consumer behavior, data analytics, entrepreneurship, human resources, strategy, and much more. Organizations around the world utilize their research to make crucial decisions, while students rely on them to break down challenging concepts and encourage skill development.

But competition for these leading thinkers, teachers, and researchers—both promising young scholars and mid-career standouts—is intense, and the growth of new degree programs and our undergraduate population increases demand. To maintain our high standards for educational excellence and continue to support research that addresses genuine business challenges, we must secure and retain high-caliber faculty.

 

  • Investing in the Faculty Pipeline

    Through the Lawrence Fellowship

    Gordon Burtch
    Jim and Mary Lawrence

    Jim and Mary Lawrence want to plug what they call the “doughnut hole” in the tenure track.

    “When you get a PhD, we all know you are desperate for any job you can have, although that is less true of business schools” he says. “When you are offered a job at the U, you most likely will be delighted to take it.” He notes that the Carlson School has a proven track record of selecting the best of the next generation of faculty coming out of PhD programs.

    The doughnut hole typically appears after the faculty member’s third or fourth year, or just after tenure. “At that time, the faculty member will have published probably the best research they will publish in the course of their lives,” he says. The research is out there for other institutions to see it. Let’s say they happen to need an expert on labor economics in Eastern Europe and there is a professor at the Carlson School who has written about it. Then they swoop in.

    “At that point, the professor will be judging his or her options,” he says. “’OK, I’m pretty good at my discipline, but will I be better off at a big brand school?’ Stanford, Harvard, or Wharton might be able to steal our faculty.”

    This is where the Lawrence Fellowship comes in. The purpose of the fellowship is to hold the best junior and mid-level faculty. “Hold them until we give them tenure, and just after,” he says. “It allows Dean Sri Zaheer and her committee to figure out who the people we hired four to eight years ago turned out to be the stars. Let’s give them more money or give them time off to do more wonderful research.”

    Mary says the Fellowship is a great opportunity to retain the best at the Carlson School. “This is a critical time to keep your faculty happy and give them extra salary or some unencumbered time to do research and to let them know we appreciate what they are doing,” she says.

    Five faculty members were honored as the inaugural Lawrence Fellows earlier this year. They include Information and Decision Sciences Assistant Professor Gordon Burtch (pictured above) and Associate Professor Yuqing Ren, Strategic Management and Entrepreneurship Assistant Professor Aseem Kaul, and Work and Organizations Assistant Professor Aaron Sojourner and Associate Professor Colleen Manchester.

    “We met the Lawrence Fellows recently and they are just outstanding,” Jim says. For example, “We have this one woman [Manchester] who is a Stanford undergrad and a Stanford PhD and we got her, not Stanford B-school! That’s just fantastic.”

    This is a critical time to keep your faculty happy and give them extra salary or some unencumbered time to do research and to let them know we appreciate what they are doing.
Your investment develops leaders, spurs innovation, and sustains excellence.

Naming opportunities are available to support students, faculty, experiential learning, and facilities. 

More About Naming Opportunities »

  • Learning to Be Good Business Citizens

    Rand Park, Senior Lecturer

    Rand Park
    Ethics Class

    “What would you do if you were an employee and had been asked to work in an environment that was unsafe?” Rand Park asks the class of about 65 mostly first-year Carlson School students.

    It’s the start of a discussion that covers employment policies and regulations, including anti-discrimination laws, whistleblowing, and grievance procedures. The class watches clips of interviews with the women who inspired the movie North Country, based on the story behind the first class action sexual harassment lawsuit in the United States.

    These are the kinds of thorny issues—and relevant ones, particularly in light of the current news cycle—that Park presents to his students in MGMT 1005 Corporate Responsibility and Ethics. It’s one of two required management courses that undergraduate students typically take during their first year at the Carlson School.

    And many of those students get their formal introductions to business ethics from Park, the immensely popular senior lecturer in the Strategic Management and Entrepreneurship Department who teaches the majority of the course’s sections.

    “There are a lot of kids on this campus that are only hearing bad things (about business),” he adds.

    The 75 minutes in Park’s course are a combination of lecture, discussion, small-group activities, videos, live polls, and more, all centered on the delicate balancing act between generating profits and behaving responsibly in the business arena.

    “My class is like ‘ripped from the headlines,’” he says. “Something could be in the newspaper and literally I can just bring it in the very next day and say, ‘Here is an example of what we were talking about.’”

    That’s not to say the class is merely a reactionary discussion of current events or “a parade of horribles,” as Park puts it. Throughout the semester, students study economics and history, delve into the philosophical theories of Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill, read part of Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations, and discuss feminist/psychologist Carol Gilligan’s work on ethics. They learn about the Great Recession and watch clips from The Big Short.

    “I tell my students all the time: We’re going to read some primary texts, we’re going to talk about topics. I want you to be educated people,” Park says. “It’s really a liberal arts class in the business school.”

    Students might not always recognize the value of the course going in—it is a required class on business ethics, after all. Park says he’s read plenty of course evaluations that contain something along the lines of “I thought I was going to hate this class.”

    Count Blake LaBathe, ’17 BSB, among those who were skeptical going in.

    “He made a phenomenal class out of curriculum that I wasn’t interested in,” LaBathe admits.

    Indeed, Park has established himself as an influential instructor since joining the Carlson School faculty in 2013 after a roundabout professional path. He’s journeyed from a master’s degree in English to a law degree to jobs in public finance, university administration, and fundraising. Along the way, he started teaching courses in law ethics before moving into the business realm.  

    He is a two-time winner of the Faculty of the Year award during the Undergraduate Program’s annual Business Week, as voted by the students.

    I want the students to get excited about the idea that being in business, whether it’s owning their own business or working in a company, has this incredible opportunity.
Your investment develops leaders, spurs innovation, and sustains excellence.

Naming opportunities are available to support students, faculty, experiential learning, and facilities. 

More About Naming Opportunities »

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