The Campaign for the Carlson School of Management
A Force for Transformation

A Force for Transformation

Experiential Learning

At the Carlson School, we challenge our students to learn by doing, to wrestle with real dilemmas for clients big and small, to leave the classroom and the country to explore our globally connected business world.

The Carlson School has long been a pioneer among business schools in creating real-world opportunities for students to learn in the workplace, and we continue to forge dynamic partnerships with Minnesota businesses to deliver hands-on learning experiences. We encourage and support emerging entrepreneurs who will launch startups in new industries. And, as the first business school to require an international experience, we foster a global mindset in our students.

Support of experiential learning creates opportunities for students to enrich their educations, discover and pursue their passions, and dig into local and global challenges.

  • Inspiring more women in business

    WE* Event
    Judy Corson

    Throughout her career, Judy Corson wanted to see more women get involved in business, and that desire has been with her in every step throughout her business career.

    Recently, she’s been able to inspire a whole new generation of female entrepreneurs through the Women Entrepreneurs (WE) program.

    An endowment from Corson helped establish WE at the Carlson School in 2015. WE is focused on supporting scalable, women-led startups in Minnesota, with the goal of encouraging more women entrepreneurs to develop big ideas, gain access to resources, and ultimately raise capital or establish key partnerships to grow their businesses and create jobs.

    The program creates a variety of events and programming that aim to inspire more women to pursue ambitious entrepreneurial efforts. Since its founding in 2015, WE has hosted nearly 30 different events.

    “It’s so important that we grow a pipeline of women who can be the next generation of entrepreneurial leaders,” Corson says.

    Corson had a successful business career of her own. She left her position at Pillsbury in 1974 to co-found Custom Research Inc., a national marketing research firm. She and her business partners sold the company in 1999. As the first woman named to the board of directors of two Fortune 500 companies, she received the University’s Outstanding Achievement Award and was inducted into the Minnesota Women Business Owners Hall of Fame in 2014.

    After her career, Corson felt it was time to give back. She was the benefactor of WE and the chair of the Gary S. Holmes Center for Entrepreneurship.

    “I wanted to pass along the things that I know so other women can have the background and skill to hopefully start developing their own careers and their own businesses,” she says. “When you see other people accomplish their goals, it makes you feel really good about giving back.”

    WE and the support it lends to aspiring female business leaders is near to her heart. Through two annual conferences, quarterly networking events, student fellowships and awards, and other community events, WE is inspiring, educating, and connecting women with essential resources.

    “I love to be involved in helping people achieve their goals,” she says. “It’s so vital for women to get the opportunities to start and grow their own business.”

    Women, Corson says, oftentimes run into more difficulties when starting a business than men do. They can struggle to receive funding for their ideas and to find mentors who will help them along the way. The hope is that through connections made at the Carlson School, more women will be able to overcome those challenges.

    “Our hope is that women will find their role models and potential mentors, who they can meet with as they start their own business,” she says. “This is so critical to women in the early stages of their career.”

     

    Our hope is that women will find their role models and potential mentors, who they can meet with as they start their own business. This is so critical to women in the early stages of their career.
Your investment develops leaders, spurs innovation, and sustains excellence.

Naming opportunities are available to support students, faculty, experiential learning, and facilities. 

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  • MIS Students Learn Tools of the Trade

    Boston Scientific Case Competition

    Boston Scientific Case Competition
    Boston Scientific Case Competition

    It’s not often a vice president at a global corporation turns to a group of undergraduate students for advice on a potential major technology upgrade.

    But that’s precisely the situation that played out last month at the Carlson School in Information & Decision Sciences 3202 through a revamped case competition in partnership with Boston Scientific (BSC).

    The 120 students in Assistant Professor Sofia Bapna’s course had 2½ minutes to hook the judges—think the reality show Shark Tank—on their proposals for adopting blockchain technology at the Fortune 500 medical device company.

    And their reward for a successful pitch? Fielding some tough—and specific—questions face-to-face and off the cuff from the judges, who included two VPs and two directors from BSC, along with senior information technology leaders from General Mills and Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota.

    “We had broad business value (in our presentation), and that’s what you kind of learn in a textbook. You learn the big, broad value, but they’re looking for specific little bits and pieces,” said Mitchell Wanous, a junior majoring in Finance and Management Information Systems (MIS). “Getting questions like that, where it was, ‘How can we actually implement this in Boston Scientific?’ ‘Where’s the specifics on it?’ was just a little bit different perspective.

    “They were actually trying to learn something from us. You could tell, the questions were tailored where they were trying to get us to give them more information so they could learn about it.”

    That’s precisely why BSC chose blockchain as this year’s topic, according to Ben Amel, ‘12 MBA and the company’s vice president of information technology sell and support. Blockchain, which essentially creates global, secure, constantly updated records ledgers, has been touted as a transformational technology for the healthcare industry.

    Bapna said exposure to leading-edge technology like blockchain will prove valuable for students as they start their careers. “When they graduate and land their first jobs, they are likely to find that most businesses are thinking about how to use blockchain. These students will have an understanding of blockchain going in,” said Bapna. “They’ve tried to solve a real business problem using this technology. It’s not new to them.”

    When they graduate and land their first jobs, they are likely to find that most businesses are thinking about how to use blockchain. These students will have an understanding of blockchain going in.
Your investment develops leaders, spurs innovation, and sustains excellence.

Naming opportunities are available to support students, faculty, experiential learning, and facilities. 

More About Naming Opportunities »

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